Guest Articles

Guest Article: Picking the right breed for your family!

I get this question all the time… “How do I know what type of dog is best for me?” We choose a F1 mini Goldendoodle for many reasons. First, I’m allergic to dogs…so strange since I grew up with them but as I aged I became allergic to them. Second, my husband and I want to grow our family in the next couple years and we know that Goldendoodles are great with children. Third, they don’t shed. Fourth, their temperament in general was just a disposition we wanted to be around all the time (we both love golden retrievers!). There are many many many other reasons why we decided on a mini Goldendoodle and I’d be happy to share- feel free to email me if you have questions about getting a fur baby!

I was so excited when Jessica from ourbestfriends.pet organization wanted to do a guest blog article on picking the right breed for your family. Getting a dog is a big decision and Jessica gives some great tips! Take a look below and make sure check out their website!

A Humane and Responsible Decision: Choosing the Right Breed for Your Family

by: Jessica Brody

The relationship between a pet and its owner can be a mutually rewarding and long-lasting one if you find  the right animal and breed for your family and lifestyle. A number of factors go into making that decision, one that should be taken seriously and with an objective consideration of the facts. It isn’t a cookie-cutter choice; there’s no one-size-fits-all pet. They each have their own requirements and temperaments, and some may be more suitable for you than others. There are many cases of people who have made hasty decisions and had to return a pet to the local Humane Societyor some other animal shelter. That’s bad news for the animal, who may not get another chance at being chosen. 

Physical suitability

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An honest assessment of your square footage, inside and out, should play a big role in your decision. If you’re living in a two-bedroom apartment, it’s unfair to bring home a great dane or a mastiff, even if your landlord allows dogs. A small or medium-sized dog, like a beagle, would probably be a better fit, or perhaps a cat. Many people like having a big dog roaming the property to ward off intruders, which can work as long as your yard is big enough to allow him to stretch his legs and enjoy some playtime. 

For convenience, consider installing a dog door to make it easy for your pooch to get in and out and an automatic feederto help him stay on a regular feeding schedule. Remember that a large pet needs a comfortable place to sleep with enough room to spread out instead of in a cubby hole that forces him to seek room alongside you in bed. 

Kids

It’s essential to consider the impact a pet will have on your children. Think twice before bringing home a large breedof dog, such as a pit bull, rottweiler or chow chow, which are active and powerful breeds that can turn aggressive suddenly and unexpectedly. It’s unfair to the animal, who might have to be put down after an attack, and you could scar a child psychologically as well as physically. 

Avoid aggressive breeds if your children are very young and apt to pull Fido’s tail just for the fun of it. A cat can be a safer alternative, though it may be necessary to have it declawed(be aware that many animal societies recommend against this, and many vets won’t perform the procedure unless it’s medically necessary). Don’t forget to consider allergies, which will be exacerbated by pet hair and dander. 

Unless you settle on a fish, be prepared to deal with hair on the furniture, on the carpet and in the corners and in air ducts. The hairier your pet, the more you’ll need a top-notch vacuum cleanerwith plenty of attachments for reaching into tight spots, and under chairs and tables. If yours isn’t up to the challenge, do some online research to find the best option for maintaining a clean home. 

Your schedule

How much time you can realistically expect to spend with a pet is another important factor and should be taken seriously. People with very busy lives and serious responsibilities at work that keep them away from home for long periods aren’t the best candidates for owning an animal that needs and craves love and attention. This is especially true of dogs, which are highly sociable animals. Here again, a cat can be a good option, but remember that cats require attentionas well and certainly won’t thrive in a neglectful living environment. 

Acclimatization

Dogs and cats are creatures of habit, and a change of living environment can be an unsettling experience. Take care to make your new pet’s arrival as smooth as possible. Set up a space just for him, in a quiet spot in a part of your home that’s not as heavily trafficked as others. Be prepared to spend time with your new family member in the beginning to help him make the transition, especially if you’ve brought home a rescue petwho’s been subjected to abuse. 

It’s important to be realistic about providing care for the pet you choose. It’s unrealistic to expect that you’ll be spending hours every day with a pet, but you don’t want to bring an animal into a situation of benign neglect, no matter how unintentional. Use common sense and make a humane decision.

 

Courtesy of Pixabay.com.       

Link: http://www.ourbestfriends.pet

REAL TALK – Your Friends Aren’t Into Your Dog

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It can be tough to have a dog and a social life. It can be even tougher when a friend isn't a dog person or struggles to understand your need to buy 1000 bandanas for your dog and make sure it only eats my ollie out of the fridge. There is NOTHING wrong with being a little pooch obsessed. People are obsessed with shoes, their children, home decor, watermelon, and exercise so who cares! Erin Marquez submitted a piece on how to find balance as a dog mom when you're friends aren't as obsessed with your dog as you are! Read below! 

 Submission by Erin Marquez - Mom of @zaratheminidoodle

Hi, hello, hey you! Does a (large) portion of your paycheck go toward making sure your fur baby has the tastiest, high-quality food? This season’s latest and greatest toys? A fancy little bandana or bowtie for every day of the week? Does your dog have their own Insta, with more followers than you do on your personal account? Do you alter your daily schedule to make sure they are happy, exhausted, and feel included? Cool, me too! Welcome to the “I’m obsessed with my dog” club, population: 99.9% of dog parents.

This is a great club to be a part of until it’s not, and it’s definitely not when your friends, family, and/or acquaintances aren’t as enthusiastic about your pup as you are. This could be for a variety of reasons: maybe they’re allergic; maybe they think dogs are perpetually dirty; maybe they just don’t like animals. The easy solution to this issue is to say “you don’t like my dog, I don’t like you” – but life isn’t easy. Human relationships are complicated, and as much as you might want to ignore or cut someone out for not liking your dog, it likely won’t be that simple. 

Having dealt with this issue on a few different occasions here are my tips for handling it like pro, if and/or when it happens to you: 

1. Recognize it.When my husband and I finally decided we were ready to bring our little pup home, we quickly realized not everyone in our life was as excited as we were. I find it common that a lot of pet parents are blind to this, which I can 110% understand – I mean, how can anyone NOT love a five pound ball of fluff with a pink little belly and poor balance?As hard as it may be to take a step back, I would urge to you pay close attention to a person’s mood, body language, and verbal cues when you bring your dog around and/or talk about them. Does the person seem disinterested? Annoyed? Maybe they try to change the subject all together or disengage? These are obvious signs that someone isn’t into your dog. If you can recognize this, you’re on the right track.

2.    Accept it.It’s taken me a long time to be ok with the fact that not everyone is going to like my dog. I might not be able to relate to or understand it completely, but I can radically accept it, and you can, too!It’s similar with humans: not everyone is going to like you and you’re probably not going to like everyone. This doesn’t diminish your value or worth. Sometimes you just don’t mesh – there’s no click or spark; you have nothingin common. I hope by this point in your life, you’ve realized it’s not the end of the world if you’re not liked by everyone you meet, and I promise it won’t be if someone doesn’t like your dog, either. 

3. Respect it.If you can accept it, you can, and should, respect it. If you know your friends or family aren’t quite on board with your dog, give them a break from him. I’m the first to admit I want to do everythingwith my dog, but I can also admit that I enjoy having a meal without having to share it or having a conversation with someone without worrying if my pup needs to go potty.Always be sure to ask before you assume your dog is invited to something, and try not to take offense when they’re not. Being a respectful dog owner makes you a good dog owner, and may even be the reason your dog-neutral or dog-disliking friends and family start to (eventually, hopefully) warm up to your pooch.

Bringing home a puppy can be one of the most challenging, yet rewarding things you do. Your dog can quickly become the center of your world and teach you a lot about yourself and others. The simple, albeit harsh, truth is that no matter how much you love your fur baby, not everyone is going to. Recognize it, accept it, and respect it. In the end, it just means more puppy snugs and kisses for you, right?

Hi, My name is leave it!

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Pax's middle name should be leave it or drop it or NO and  I've heard from so many other  puppy parents that they have the same challenges. I have also received many questions in relationship to puppy training which I am not adequate to answer since I am not trained in dog behavior....only human :)

I feel so fortunate to have connected with Nicole Parayano with PupScouts Dog Training to answer some of your most frequently asked questions! Now, there are MANY MANY MANY different types of dog training out there and some techniques work better for different dogs so just know that when working with your pup!

Here are Nicole's answers to your questions: 

1) Should my puppy go to dog training? Absolutely! There are so many options that you can look into! You may find a great trainer in your area that can give you awesome one-on-one guidance with you and your puppy, or you can enroll your dog in group training sessions which tend to be a great opportunity for your pups to socialize! Some families might choose to self-train, while others might opt for sending their pups off to a board and train program. Regardless of which way you go, training your pup is essential! A tired pup is a happy pup, and by training with your dog, you are stimulating their brain, and get them physically AND mentally tired! Training helps build a firm foundation and a positive relationship between you and your pup, and who doesn't want that?! By training basic obedience commands, socializing, exercising, and understanding your dog's needs, you will likely avoid problem behaviors that many families run into.

2) How young should i take them? Training begins the moment they come home. My beloved Cookie, who passed away last year, entered my life at 8 weeks old, and the moment I took her home, we worked on potty pad training and responding to her name. The very next day Cookie adjusted to wearing a collar. Little things that might seem meaningless all serve a purpose! Every interaction with family in the home was made a positive one. You might not know it, but your dog is watching you and they are learning that the things that they do cause you to react in a certain way. Puppies have a short attention span, so depending on their age, you're lucky if you can get 5 minutes in! Of course, when you get a new dog they have to adjust to their new life in their new home. After all, we've just flipped their lives upside down! They've been taken from their littermates and their momma, and now here they are, with new sights, new sounds, and new smells! Try not to overwhelm them and go at your own pup's pace :) It's never too late to start training with your pup, however, the earlier that you can start, the better!

3) How does training help? Training builds trust and it also creates mutual respect. Training is also a great solution for energetic dogs! You stimulate the brain and make them think. By using all that mental energy, they'll be pooped in no time! Training may also save your dog's life. For example, someone leaves the front door open, and Fido bolts out the door! A quick, "Fido, come!" would make him turn around and head safely into your arms. Another reason why training your dog helps is because fewer trained dogs end up in a shelter when families invest some time and effort every day to commit to training with their dog. 

4) Which parent is the alpha? Anyone can be a leader in your dog's eyes if you have a history of reinforcement with them. The respect is earned, not given and I don't believe that there has to be ONE leader. Your dog will interact and work with both parents, in their own way. However there might be times when you are both together, and Fido seems to gravitate toward mom more than dad. For example, Cookie, my previous pup was phenomenal with all of her basic obedience commands, her tricks, and her ability to distinguish a specific scent. She listened perfectly with me, and she also performed just as well with my partner. But put us both in the same room with her and she'd likely choose me (almost) every time. The respect is there, but because I spent the most time with her, fed her the most, trained with her the most, etc., I had a slightly stronger bond with her. If you want your pup to listen to you equally, then you both need to put the same amount of work and effort into training with your pup.   

5) How can i get my dog to listen to me? When your dog doesn't listen to you or your commands, it can definitely feel quite frustrating. What I find helpful is allowing my dog some exercise before training. If they've got pent up energy, how can they focus on you when all they want to do is GO, GO, GO? Allow them some time to release that energy and then work on training. It's also important that you remain consistent with training. Sit down with each member in your household to ensure that all the verbal commands, hand signals, rules, and boundaries are all the same among everyone. If one person lets Fido on the couch and you keep telling him to get off, he's receiving mixed signals! Another thing to keep in check is your energy. Dogs will listen to and respect someone who is calm and assertive. Dogs feed off your energy and your body language and if you are nervous, unsure, or angry, you're giving off the vibe that you aren't in control. Lastly, if your dog isn't listening to you, maybe it's because they don't actually understand what you're trying to relay to them, so go back to the basics and work on whatever it is that you're doing needs to work on. Training takes a lot of time, and hundreds of repetition and reinforcement for the dog to perform the way you want them to. 

6) My dog pulls on their leash, how can I get my pup to stop!? This can depend on how old your dog is. As a puppy, it's normal for the dogs to pull back and "halt". Puppies are likely to refuse to move forward, chew on the leash, pancake to the floor, or pull back because wearing a collar and a leash is totally foreign to them. However, if your dog is older, they're likely pulling, instead of anchoring themselves to the ground. When walking with your dog, sometimes a quick "U-turn" helps. A "U-turn" is when you're walking forward, notice them pulling, and you quickly walk in the opposite direction. This requires a lot of patience, time, and treats. I always carry treats on me, and you can also try a luring method. What you can do is take a treat, keep it close to your dog's nose, and begin walking with them. When they are at a pace and placement that you like, you can release the treat to your dog, followed by verbal praise, and the command that you choose to call it ie: "heel". Begin walking forward again with another treat luring your dog to match your pace and stay in a position that you approve, and then release the treat! In order to have a harmonious walk, you need to practice, practice, practice! Some trainers find that standing still until the leash relaxes works, and that is definitely something that you can try doing as well.  Reward FREQUENTLY, walk ROUTINELY and remember to keep your energy in check. The more frustrated you are with the situation, the less likely your dog will want to focus on learning with you. I like to practice leash walking skills in the home first, so your dog is free of any distractions, and then you can eventually begin the same practice outside. 

7) How much food should I reward my dog with? It depends on your dog's age. If you are using treats to reward your dog, good for you! But make sure that you are using low-calorie training treats that are small and chewy because with training and treat rewards, you're likely going to be giving them a ton of treats! Bigger treats that take time to chew on take time away from training because you're spending several seconds waiting for your dog to finish just that first treat! Some younger pups can use their kibble for training in the beginning. You can use their whole cup of breakfast/dinner, or half of their breakfast/dinner for training if you feel so inclined. Keep in mind though, that you want to gradually wean off treat rewards. Once your dog has mastered the given verbal command and/or hand signal, you can replace a treat with a pet on the head, a belly rub, verbal praise, etc. But the goal is to eventually remove treats from the equation. If your dog is given treats every time for the same command, they will likely lose interest and no longer perform the command as consistently if you stop the treats cold turkey.

8) My dog has a social anxiety problem, how can I help him? It's so important to socialize your puppy at a young age to avoid having social anxiety. However if it seems like your dog already is socially anxious, you should start slow with public interactions. See what exactly makes your dog anxious or fearful; is it another dog? A specific person or type of person? Is it the sounds of cars passing by? Figure out what exactly makes your dog anxious and work your way toward desensitizing and normalizing those things to your dog. Desensitizing your fearful or anxious dog requires a lot of time, patience, and positivity! Take it slow. It's important that you don't cuddle them or try to comfort them when they are in their fearful mode, as this reinforces the scared behavior and teaches the dog that it's okay to be afraid because they will be rewarded with hugs. Make every outing fun. The process of socializing your dog and desensitizing your dog can vary depends on how badly they react to whatever it is that is scaring them.

9) Every time I leave my pup at home they are crying for me.  Sounds like your pup is anxious! Or bored. Your dog probably isn't used to being along or having their own separate downtime, away from you. This could be a small form of separation anxiety, and it's definitely something that you want to take care of ASAP. First and foremost, I like to use a crate for my dogs while I'm away. I can leave my dogs in their crates for short amounts of time with a toy and that way they aren't having any accidents while I'm away or destroying everything around them in a panic frenzy. Whenever your dog is crying, whatever you do... DO NOT give in and return to your dog. This will teach your dog that if they cry, mom or dad will always come back, and this allows them to control the relationship. You need to desensitize your dog to you leaving them alone. Start small and give them short amounts of downtime to themselves while you're home. Leave them alone and stay just outside the door, quietly. Eventually, distance yourself further and further, and increase the length of time in which you are away from your dog. When they're quiet, you can come back to them and calmly let them out (feel free to give them a treat too!). But you just don't want to let them out until they are quiet. It's also helpful if you leave them after they've exhausted their energy! A good way to exercise them is taking them out for a walk before leaving, having some playtime, etc. It's best not to leave your dog home alone or away from you while their energy is off the charts! Leave them when they are calm, do not make a big deal out of you leaving or coming home, and set a daily routine! I like to calmly acknowledge my dogs after about 5 minutes of coming home when they're also calm(er). Another thing you can try doing is leaving them alone with a puzzle toy or Kong toy stuffed with PB! Give them something tasty to focus on instead of you leaving. 

10) To crate train or not to crate train? I love crate training. A crate or kennel serves many purposes! If you haven't been reading this in order, I've mentioned the positives of using a crate quite a few times :) Just a few of the positives about crate training: - It's the quickest way to potty train! - Provides a safe space for your pup and keeps them from getting into anything harmful while you're away. - Creates a den and their own "safe space".

11) How to stop puppy nipping and redirect?  As a puppy, it's completely natural for them to want to chew on things. They are exploring the world around them and are unaware that their teeth are razor sharp. Your puppy also doesn't realize how much is too much when using their mouth. There are a few things you can try doing. 1) I like to yelp really loudly or loudly say, "OW!!!" and ignore my dog for several seconds after they've chomped a little too hard. Gradually by continuously "removing" playtime and yelping loudly, your dog will learn that biting too hard takes away the fun time. 2) When your pup bites too hard, yelp loudly, wait until they've stopped, and then try giving them a treat that they CAN chew on in place of your hands. 3) Keep tons of great chewing toys available for your dog to play with and chew on. Some toys are interactive and are only fun to your dog when you're playing with them, so if they go for your hands, immediately redirect them to chewing on the toy instead! Remember, your puppy is probably teething right now and needs lots of things to chew on. They will soon begin losing their teeth and it's not very comfortable for them. As they lose their teeth, you can also try soothing them by giving them frozen or cold toys to chew on, it helps with numbing their gums a bit. Eventually, their razor little teeth will turn into adult teeth.

12) How do I know what aggressive play is between puppies? Dogs use signals to communicate with one another. You can tell a dog is trying to play when they "play bow". A "play bow" looks like your dog's rear end is up in the air while his front half is down. This is displayed just before a dog begins to play with another dog. Another way you can tell that a dog is playing is when your dog looks like they're panting, but their mouths are open wider than normal; you can just see in their faces that they are happy, bouncing around, and having fun. I recommend you look into pictures and videos of what aggressive and play body language truly look like to get a sense of what your dog is trying to communicate with the other dog. If things begin to get too heated, separate the two dogs for "time out" several minutes before beginning to play again. This will take time, but eventually, the "aggressor" will learn that this behavior takes away the reward (playing) and they will learn not to behave that way. Keep an eye on the pups, notice the signs, and interrupt their playtime before it gets too crazy. Playing with other dogs is healthy and a great way to not only burn off extra energy, but it's also a fun way to socialize.

13) How much exercise does my dog need? The amount of exercise your dog needs is dependent on 1) the breed type 2) their size 3) their age 4) their health. For example, a Yorkie will not need as much exercise as a German Shepherd. A 12-year-old dog will not require as much exercise as a 6-month-old puppy. While most families simply take their dogs out for walks or to play fetch, there are various ways to exercise your pup! - Training and having them work for treats (Remember that training and teaching your dog new tasks or commands, or simply reinforcing old ones helps to exercise the brain!) -Setting up small (or large) obstacle courses - Scenting/tracking and using their noses and brains - If you have multiple dogs, let them play together and tucker themselves out. Figure out what works best for your dog :) 

14) How to stop digging holes? Digging is a natural behavior in dogs. Your dog could be digging for various reasons: - They're bored and they find that digging at the moment relieves them of their boredom 2) They're trying to escape (anxiety due to separation, something that is scaring them such as thunderstorms, etc) -They smell something or hear something that is enticing to them in the ground 3) They are digging to create a hole to cool down in and escape the heat 4) They're trying to hide their toys/treats. So if you're trying to stop your dog from digging holes in your backyard, you need to figure out the "why". Why are they doing it? And go from there. If they are chewing to get away from the heat, provide them some more shade in the backyard or somewhere to cool down or bring them in.. If they are digging due to boredom, give them toys that they can play with. If they are digging because they're afraid of a thunderstorm, bring them in. If they are digging because of a smell or something in the ground, get rid of rodents that are enticing them and look into finding some sort of digging deterrent. -Make sure they get enough exercise before leaving them out by themselves as well. If you catch them in the act, stop them as they're doing it with a loud "UH UH!!" or whatever "negative" marker word you have for your dog. 

15) Does my dog know how to swim? A dog will naturally begin "doggy paddling" when they're in the water, but that doesn't mean they're capable of actually staying afloat. Some dogs might even be quite fearful of water! You can deduce what the case may be for your pup, but I highly recommend purchasing a floaty vest for your pooch to wear when in the pool regardless! Better safe than sorry!

Nicole is a professional dog trainer in Las Vegas, Nevada. She has been training for several years and has excellent reviews from her clients. For more information about her training services please check out @PupScoutsDogTraining  and at https://m.facebook.com/PupScoutsDogTraining/?ref=page_internal

 

Roadtrippin' with Brittany & Layla!

Recently, I went to Italy and wasn't able to bring Pax with me. The worst. Most of you know already what happened during Pax's rover stay and it got me thinking about how cool it would be to take Pax on vacation so I could 1) never worry 2) be a complete control freak 3) watch him see things for the first time 4) Bring more smiles and belly rubs to him!  Good reasons right? We do have some trips coming up and we plan on taking him. Luckily, this community is so global and incredible he will have playmates all over the country as we explore around. SO HOOMANS make sure you holler at me once I let you know our upcoming destinations! 

Puppy mama, Brittany, must have been on the same wave length as I have been because she emailed me about her upcoming road trip with her pup Layla. She has FANTASTIC tips on how to prepare for a journey like this with your pup and I'm so excited for you all to read about it. Make sure you follow their journey when they hit the road on June 30th-July 8th by following Layla's instagram @layla.doodlebug for pics and videos! Brittany is also looking for dog friendly recommendations in Nashville and Atlanta so if you have any make sure you DM her!

Here is Brittany & Layla's Story (including awesome tips!)

This is my 10 month old doodle, Layla Bug. From day one I have taken her with me as often as I could whenever I went to dog-friendly places. We started training rather early and will have 25 weeks of classes under our belt by the end of summer. Layla is a great dog, don’t get me wrong, but I never want people to get the impression that she was just “naturally” social, obedient and a good car rider. I’ve raised her that way! I exposed her to a lot of car rides, smells, sounds and people as often as I could. 

I’ve been taking Layla to the dog park and working with her in training with hopes to be able to trust her in any setting and be confident in her obedience. We have finally gotten to a place where I know for certain that she will listen and I don’t have to worry about her putting us or others in danger due to lack of obedience. 

With all of that, I’m planning a road trip! Just Layla and myself. We live in St. Louis and our last stop is Atlanta. We are making stops to hike and stay in Nashville. It’s been so cool to see more and more places accommodate our pups! As I’m sure you can imagine, this takes a little bit of extra planning. On a regular road trip, you get hungry and you stop. With a dog, you have to consider them too! It’s never okay to leave her in the car alone and another advantage of stopping (for me, anyway) is to take a break and stretch my legs. Our pooches need that too! I’ve been tracking the route I’ll likely take so that I can plan those stops with dog-friendly places. I also know myself, I don’t want a super specific plan. So instead of having a super specific route, I’m just going to have a few options for stops. That way we can stop when we need it. 

Layla and I have traveled a lot together but this will be our biggest adventure to date! So I’ve listed a few tips that have helped us be a great travel team. Note that each dog has their own needs and personality—not everything will work for you. And you may have tips that don’t work for us. And that’s cool! 

  • Tip 1: know your pup! If they are super unpredictable, it may be good to wait a little longer for an extended trip. For me, I want to know that she will be good in the car and good out in public. This means no jumping and minimal barking.

  • Tip 2: start small! We’ve done a handful of just hour long trips. My mom lives about a half hour away, so that helped us build up to an hour. If I’m running errands, I try to go to dog friendly places so that she can come with me...even if it means an extra trip. I’ll go get groceries, come home and then grab Layla to go get dog food at Petsmart.

  • Tip 3: go to a training class! And it’s not necessarily because your dog doesn’t know “sit” and “down”. It’s actually a great way to socialize your pup with all types of dogs and people under a watchful professional. That can build more confidence for those times you are eating out on the patio next to other people and dogs that walk by.

  • Tip 4: pack accordingly! Just like a kid, your dog needs special things packed too. Toys, bowls, water (and lots of it!), leash, poop bags, any harness that helps, treats etc. I plan to pack food only for the days that we are on the road. I know we can buy food when we get there and that’s one less thing taking up room in my car. I’d also add wet wipes for potential muddy paws.

  • Tip 5: be flexible! Don’t make a plan that doesn’t leave room for flexibility. There may be more or less stops than expected. You may find a city or park you and your pal really like and decide to stay longer.

I’m excited to see how this trip goes. I’m sure I’ll learn more things along the way and I’m sure I’ll have a few plans that fall through. And I’m fine with that. If all goes well, road trips may be a more frequent thing for us! 

<3 

Make sure to follow Layla's journey! One thing I would add to your upcoming journey humans is to do your homework! Reach out to your Instagram community in different cities and ask about dog friendly places so you have ideas on where to go! If you don't have it already "Bring Fido" app talks about dog friendly places around the country! 

Do you have travel tips that you would like to share! Make sure you join the tribe and send in your story!!